Mississippi residents know how dangerous it can be to drive around large trucks. From 2009 to 2017, there was a 28 percent increase in the number of large truck crash fatalities. Of the 4,102 victims in 2017, 68 percent were occupants of cars, and 14 percent were pedestrians, bicyclists or motorcyclists. Rear-end accidents are especially common; incidentally, they are the most devastating but also the most easily avoided with the right technology.

Many truck safety groups are pushing for the mandating of forward crash warning systems on all heavy trucks as a way to reduce rear-end collisions. This is what the National Transportation Safety Board has recommended to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on at least 10 occasions since the 1990s, but NHTSA has not acted on the recommendation or even proposed a regulation of its own.

NHTSA’s communications department did issue a written statement saying that it is studying the technology as well as testing next-generation automatic emergency braking. However, critics say that NHTSA should instead be focusing on those devices that are already available and already proven to save lives.

Many new cars come with AEB and forward collision warning systems. The auto industry claims that these devices will become standard features by 2022, yet truck safety devices are not keeping up with the pace of technological advancement.

Safety devices cannot prevent all truck wrecks, of course. There are many cases in which truckers are to blame for accidents. People who are injured may, for their part, file an accident claim against the trucking company. If successful, they might be covered for losses like medical expenses, vehicle damage, lost wages and the diminished capacity to earn a living. If you have been injured in a wreck with a truck,  call George B. Ready for experienced, aggressive help with your claims for your injuries.