In Mississippi and across the U.S., distracted driving is a dangerous trend. The Travelers Companies surveyed more than 2,000 consumers and executives about this subject and found certain trends that shed light on it. Among these trends is the pressure that drivers feel to use their phones for work purposes.

Eighty-seven percent of executives said that they expect their workers to be reachable even outside the office. This may be why 20 percent of respondents said they feel pressured into responding to work-related messages: They do not want to upset their boss. In fact, 17 percent say that driving is the time when they get a lot of work done.

Incidentally, 74 percent of executives do not think that distracted driving is of great concern. Though three in four businesses have a distracted driving policy, only 40 percent of employers said they know of an employee who was disciplined for non-compliance with it. A mere 18 percent of businesses encourage their workers to set their phones to Do Not Disturb before heading out on the road.

Lack of communication is another problematic trend. Sixteen percent never speak up when in the car with a distracted driver. One-third of parents have not spoken to their children about distracted driving. According to the survey, 54 percent of respondents said they would not cut out distracting behavior if someone told them to.

Whatever pressures may be present, drivers have a duty to keep their car under control at all times. If they neglect their duty of care to others and cause an auto accident, their auto insurance company may find itself facing a claim. Victims should call the office of George B. Ready to determine if they have good grounds for a claim under Mississippi’s pure comparative negligence rule.