Road construction is a seemingly constant reality across northwestern Mississippi, and unfortunately, encountering construction may not just slow you down but also pose heightened risks of injury or fatalities. Successfully navigating through construction zones can be challenging, and this, coupled with the other hazards these areas present, make work zones statistically more dangerous for you than other areas of the roadway. 

Per the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration, the number of people passing away in car wrecks in work zones rose 3% between 2016 and 2017. Meanwhile, road deaths resulting from non-work-zone-related circumstances decreased by 1.5% within that time. 

Construction zone hazards 

What is it about construction that make these sites particularly dangerous? Unfortunately, the hazards of today’s road construction zones are varied and numerous. 

In some cases, simply the change in traffic patterns is enough to cause confusion and crashes. Narrow or unclear rights-of-way may also contribute to the rising number of traffic fatalities in construction zones. Large trucks and equipment that make it more difficult to see what lies ahead raise your work-zone crash risk. So do other drivers who fail to slow down and exercise vigilance when navigating these areas. 

Dangers for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians 

While you are more likely to pass away in a work zone when traveling as a driver or passenger in a motor vehicle, these areas also present clear threats for cyclists and pedestrians. The number of bicyclists and pedestrians who lose their lives in U.S. construction zones rose 9% between 2016 and 2017. 

While road construction presents dangers on its own, statistics show that drivers who speed in work zones pose a particular threat to you and the entire motoring public. In 2017, speed had a hand in more than 200 road deaths that occurred in construction zones. 

If you are among those who suffered an injury or lost a loved one in a U.S. construction zone, the Law Office of George B. Ready may be able to help.